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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/16/19 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    To be fair, isn't how people feel about the changes part of the feedback and discussion?
  2. 2 points
    What did you re-use them for then? Why were they even removed? They were the only means of reliably treating brute and burn damage if chemistry was entirely inept. Now they've been replaced with single use patches that really do not heal all that much whatsoever. It'll now be even harder, if not impossible, to effectively treat someone heavily damaged. Especially Vox or Slime People. Unless of course the intention was to make them harder to revive while also making it harder to treat others, since you and others are in favor of making them harder/impossible to revive outside of transplanting? I'm not accusing or anything like that, I'm genuinely asking if that was one of the key reasons the kits were removed.
  3. 2 points
    The change is university unpopular, so it will be implemented and the community will have 0 say.
  4. 2 points
    I'm not opting for a poll at all, but to seemingly dismiss feelings about the change as not being part of the discussion or feedback feels a little rash, to me.
  5. 2 points
    because I serve to bring ruin to the galaxy
  6. 2 points
  7. 2 points
    I was resurrected via the power of pure bad idea. From a balance perspective purely, giving any of the Martial Arts to any job has to be heavily scrutinized. CQC itself has a two-click knockout (updated versions, unsure of present para version), and krav itself is stupid powerful (has a stun, a mute, and allows you to take items from other's hands using disarm) in the right hands. With a focus on protecting a total of five people in any given round, the odds of it being misused or just straight up awful to play against are so spectacularly high that I can feel the incoming salt physically, already. Blueshield has always been a problem child when it comes to overstepping it's boundaries, giving them the ability to leg sweep and judo chop anyone they can vaguely consider a threat sounds like a solid two steps in the wrong direction. You must be new to SS13, friend.
  8. 1 point
    A new critical system is on its way that is more involved, chaotic, and engaging to deal with--it's a long-awaited companion for Goonchem. This new system doesn't apply to all races--station races that do not utilize this new system are Diona, Slime People, and IPC; they will die using the old method of blacking out, slowly accumulating damage, then dying. Treating people is basically the same as before, with a few nuanced caveats. You apply patches or advanced trauma/burn kits to heal people, you inject them with chems to heal them, you can throw them in cryo to stabilize them. That said, how people lapse into crit will be fairly different. When your patient hits 0 health, they will lapse into a critical state where they can't see well, their movement can become scrambled, and they fall down a lot. During this time, they can acquire shock. Shock worsens these conditions. If shock is not treated, then the person will start undergoing cardiac failure. Treating shock can be healed by injecting saline or healing the underlying damage and getting their health solidly back into the healthy category. It's recommend you still inject saline as a primary tool, especially if they have heart failure (or you can't treat them in time while you're running to get some other medicines). Cardiac failure is even worse than shock; it'll become even more difficult to breathe, and if left untreated, will result in full out cardiac arrest. Treating cardiac failure is done with atropine or epinephrine. This condition will not go away by merely curing the underlying damage. You must treat it with atropine or epinephrine. Both chems are equally good at treating it; having both in the bloodstream, at once, increases the chances of treating it. Finally is cardiac arrest. When acquired, you'll flop on the ground and rapidly take brain and oxygen damage. Treating cardiac arrest can be done with full size defibs or the new handheld defibs. It it strongly recommended you utilize handheld defibs, as they're specialized in treating cardiac arrest. Death occurs primarily by brain damage; if the brain dies, your patient dies. A few helpful pointers and tips: -STOP RELYING ON CRYO. Cryo just heals damage, but doesn't treat the underlying conditions when someone is in a critical state. Time is your enemy under this new system; it's faster and better to apply patches (or advanced burn/trauma kits) or medicine directly to the patient than to throw them in cryo and wait for it to kick in and their body temperature to be low enough. Cryo should be used to stabilize patients who you don't have time to treat, but it shouldn't be the primary treatment method you rely on. -THERE IS A NEW HANDHELD DEFIB. Hanheld defibs work differently from full size defibs. They do not revive people from the dead. They purely treat patients undergoing cardiac arrest. They can also treat heavy O2 damage, so even if a patient isn't undergoing cardiac arrest, they are still useful for rapidly lowering O2 damage. Full size defibs cannot treat the O2 damage like handheld ones, and have a sizeable delay before activating; it's not recommend you use full size ones unless it's a desperate situation. -PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR HUD. A frowny green face is indicative of viruses; it could also mean they're in shock or undergoing cardiac failure. -CPR CAN SAVE A LIFE. CPR has been buffed dramatically under this system. It heals a significant chunk of O2 damage and completely resets the losebreath timer on a patient. In can really help, in a pinch, when someone is in critical condition. Don't expect it to save someone in full out cardiac arrest though. -Treating patients in deep critical is going to require a broad range of medications. It's strongly recommended you keep saline, epinephrine, mannitol, and salbutamol on you for dealing with deeply critical patients. Handheld defibs can help correct high amounts of O2 damage as can utilizing CPR, but handheld defibs can be unreliable at this task. O2 damage can accumulate incredibly rapidly, leading to a death spiral that will result in the patient's death in no time flat. In some situations, there will be cases where there nothing you can do. Treating a patient's damage is important, but always factor in shock, heart failure, and cardiac arrest into your plan of treating your patient, or else they're going to pay the ultimate price; their death. I'm sure there's more, but this should help you get a good start and help you treat patients on some level. Feel free to ask me any questions though!
  9. 1 point
    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA.
  10. 1 point
    I agree. That's why my response on the neuro kits was "If the Medivends have mannitol, I'm not sure why Neuro-kits would be necessary." If Medical vendors already have mannitol pills in them, I am unsure why those kits are necessary.
  11. 1 point
    I will admit, as someone who plays a great deal of MedChem even recently, the changes have got me up and breaking out the closet chems to push atropine and oculine out for Medbay. Definitely more stressful but feels more rewarding as well.
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
    Ha! I was the detective that shift! Excellent work! HONK.
  14. 1 point
    We're not interested in peoples general feelings or votes over a few days of a system that's a work in progress. We want feedback and discussion about the specifics of the changes. Not a poll that indicates how people feel.
  15. 1 point
    Alright so let me be more explicit in this and pitch it to you in a way that maintainers are more likely to accept, because it's not a straight buff: Here's what we had on Oracle. https://github.com/OracleStation/OracleStation/blob/2528945aad61c2892652a98da422aba2c562d2d1/code/game/objects/items/miscellaneous.dm#L23-L46 It was a box they spawned with. When they used the box in-hands, it gave them the option of: .38 Mars Special Revolver .45 Enforcer Semi Automatic Pistol Aegis SG7 Laser Gun Once they made their selection, the box disappeared and the item was left in their hands. This actually gave a little bit of personalization and options to blueshields, and it also made it so an antag wasn't always sure what the BS had if they wanted to go after command. Nice little mind game. I think you could do the same sort of deal, except add some sort of BS Krav Maga gloves to the list.
  16. 1 point
    You have to give your players some credit. That other post regarding the PR merge speaks volumes to how the majority feels, yet it seems as though you simply do not care. And now here, when you're the one asking for people to discuss it, you seem to be dismissing genuine criticisms as "sarcasm and passive aggression". If I didn't know any better I'd say you were high on power and ignoring us all in favor of backers. All for the money, as it were. But I do know better, and I've seen better from all the staff on these forums. It does seem we're all on edge, as this is a contentious issue for all of us; players and staff alike. We need to be able to break bread and have a genuine discussion on how the community feels, and what the community wants. And don't be surprised when people get emotional about it. This game provides for some genuinely amazing experiences. So when an update may well result in more players spending whole rounds dead, it's easy to understand why people are upset. I'm not going to say there is a perfect solution, as a perfect solution for anything is an impossibility. But one thing that can majorly improve the standings here is opening up to much more community feedback. More polls, more threads like this one, more effort to stay in touch with the player base.
  17. 1 point
    Introduction: Let me tell the story of a round I played earlier today: The station is full up on jobs, >80 players. Every single Medbay role is filled to capacity...except for Doctors. Previously, there'd be up to five MDs on the manifest, with at least one or two bouncing around the Medbay at any given time. Yet in a round absolutely stuffed with players, with everything from Chemistry to the Coroner all staffed up properly, only two people even bothered to play MD. Needless to say, both of them are nowhere to be found. Two large bombs go off, in the middle of the station. Casualties are everywhere. Of course, between fastmos and the explosions themselves, it's >2 minutes by the time the bodies are brought to Medbay. None of them are revivable. Previously, MDs would receive them and begin the difficult and dangerous job of trying to SR and revive these players. Instead, they're all dumped at the Cloner like a stack of logs, where a Chemist and the CMO take turns shoving each corpse through like it's a microwave. Cloning was jam-packed, and both surgical theaters were literally spotless. I have a very, very hard time imagining the ORs being clean back when they were still relevant...but when no one's revivable, who needs 'em? This same pattern has repeated itself almost every single round that I've played during the recent changes, with only slight variations in each one. Reviving and Strange Reagent made for interesting, suspenseful resuscitation efforts, where you had to repeatedly zap someone to keep their heart afloat, do surgery to patch up their many injuries, transfuse to keep them from bleeding out again, clean as much as possible to prevent infection, etc etc etc. The new changes make Medbay - even worse, death itself - downright boring. The problems: Speaking as a real-life RN, the old approach of suspenseful, high-acuity action alongside regular, low-acuity fractures or cloning made for surprisingly on-point gameplay. The actual practice involved in treating someone is surprisingly simple most of the time; the issue in RL care is not some Dr. House-esque mystery solving and much more a question of efficiently managing resources. The new medical system, though, is less like working at a trauma center and more like working at a community health clinic (where I've seen nurses downright panic over epistaxis, a.k.a. "a nosebleed"). To try and summarize the basic issues in play: 1. Predictability: Past the two-minute mark, it's over. Boom. Done. Minimize the game and go do your laundry. Needless to say, this does not make for an interesting and engaging experience. There's no question of whether you'll get found in time, because you never get recovered in time for a defib anymore. There's no question of whether or not a competent MD will hit you with SR, because all they can do is to pop you into the cloner like a Hot Pocket and wait for it to finish cooking. Death has become boring; it's now just a question of twiddling your thumbs and watching something on YouTube until the metaphorical microwave has done its work. 2. Lack of human agency: If your corpse gets recovered, you'll likely get cloned eventually. There's nothing anyone can do to speed it up beyond the basic R&D upgrades, which means that there's no point in having anyone competent in Medbay; even the best players can't do anything more than wait for the magic cloning pod to churn through the corpses. Medbay could be crewed by the A-team or a pack of dribbling incompetents, and it has little impact (if any) on patient outcomes. 3. No effect past Medbay itself: Cloning has some new temporary downsides, but those are easily fixed with a trip in the cryopod or a bit of mutadone. It may mean more time spent twiddling your thumbs (yay, such fun, much excite), but once you've done a little more time in the cryopod then you're in the clear. The new death system means more time spent being dead, but it means literally nothing once you're alive again. 4. Lack of alternate playstyles: I've had quite a few games where some whiz-bang MD patched me up in the SS13 equivalent of a back-alley medbay. Rare, to be sure, but being revived even when the original Medbay was a flaming crater made for an interesting round that I can still recall today. The current system prevents all that, because without the cloner or getting really lucky with a defib, you're basically toast. Whoo-wee, such fun, much excite. Personal aims: I'm looking to effectively reverse these four factors. To elaborate a little on what I'd like to see: 1. Unpredictability: I don't want death to be the same thing every time. Maybe I'll get found, defibbed, and get back on my feet in no time. Maybe I'll get patched up in a cave by a guy with a box of scraps. Maybe Malpracticebay is in full effect, and the best I can hope for is to get cloned. Maybe, maybe, maybe. 2. Human agency: In keeping with the above, I want a good Medbay to be able to save lives like there's no tomorrow. Sure, make SR expensive and difficult to acquire - that just means it's cooler when the Chemists are on-point and the stuff is available in spades. Make bodies rot sooner, forcing them to be quickly injected with formaldehyde in order to be saved, or put more restrictions on how it can be used...but leave the option open. It makes for much more suspenseful, interesting, and compelling gameplay when things could happen. I don't mind failure, but I want there to be a chance of success in the first place, because having an alternative to failure makes it that much more poignant and interesting. 3. Long-term effects: To put it bluntly, I want the cloning pod to be the failure-state. I want people to hate being cloned, and the easiest way I can see that happening is to put some sort of un-fixable, long-term penalty to being cloned. Having some sort of unsolvable penalty counterbalances the ease of the cloner: it can still be the simple answer, but it's also not the one which people should want to take. The possibility of a full recovery would leave an incentive for good doctors to go through the effort of patching every boo-boo and fixing every wound (and for players to sit around in their broken bodies long enough for docs to fix them), whereas the cloner would still be a potential, if undesirable, option for people to re-enter the round. More on this below. 4. Allowing alternate playstyles: I'd like to give more options for fixing people, rather than a "one-and-done" approach. Maybe Genetics has a a power which prolongs defibrillation time with few downsides; the issue then becomes one of effectively spreading that same power stationwide, or at least to the most at-risk individuals (i.e. resource management). Maybe Medbay is reliant instead on the Coroner or a similar triage person during an MCI (Multiple Casualty Incident), with them running around and moving defib-able people to the cryopod area while injecting the long-term cases with formaldehyde before they start to decompose. Maybe transplantation would remove the cloning penalty, allowing for someone who'd been cloned by MD-McDumbass to get fixed if there were other MDs and Genetics on the ball that round. Overall, though, I'd like to see the game mechanics encouraging more options rather than simply railroading everyone towards the magic cloning microwave. Suggestions: A. The defibrillator issue: -Slightly increase defib times. IIRC the old defib-capable times were up to five minutes, while the current number is two. The current number is far too small, given that defibrillators are rarely ever used in the field; unless you die inside the Medbay itself or near a mediborg, there's no saving you. I'd suggest moving it back to five minutes, to be counterbalanced with a significant penalty (see below). If you're dead-set on reducing defib times, though, then please at least split the difference and make it 3.5 minutes instead of the current "flash in the pan." -Increased defibrillator times could be counterbalanced by having defibrillation inflict severe damage on the heart like it does IRL. This would require doctors to be careful and sparing about their defib use, and make it a gamble every time you place the paddles. Inflicting variable 10-35 heart damage per shock would allow someone to survive a single defib at a bare minimum, but would make multiple uses of the defibrillator a very dangerous game (i.e. suspenseful). Heart damage requires either chest surgery or mitocholide to fix, so either Chemistry or an MD being on the ball would be able to fix the damage. This'd add additional uncertainty due to the ever-present question of player competence, and would allow for meaningful success-stories to happen, such as "a competent Chemist saves patients from a defib-happy MD's mistakes" or vice versa. B. Strange Reagent: I'd suggest limiting SR through: -Requiring a higher dose and/or more exotic materials. Space fungus might be a good 'un, or diamond, or some similarly hard-to-acquire substance. The goal here should be to make SR achieveable to make, but only by someone who knows what the hell they're doing. Alternatively, it could require help from another department, such as needing a high power draw from Engineering, ambrosia gaia or a similar higher-level plant from Botany, or upgraded parts from Science. -Shortening the time available before a body begins decaying. I'm not sure how long the current time is until bodies start decaying, but the first stage (i.e. "They are beginning to smell") is the cutoff point for SR. If you shorten that time down, then formaldehyde and good corpse-triage becomes vital to saving them. In other words, something like this. -I think the current system of "SR revives with brain/genetics" damage is good enough as-is. It allows for revives in the field, but inflicts a serious penalty if you lack access to a cryotube, and also requires that the field medic have remembered to pack along some mannitol as well. C. Cloning: As mentioned, I'd like cloning to be the "failure-state" of Medbay. People should have a real, lasting reason to not want to be cloned, and I'd suggest the following mechanisms for doing so: -Implementing Clone Memory Disorder (CMD) for an in-character penalty. A rule like "you aren't able to remember anything that happened for the past thirty minutes" would allow for some interesting RP opportunities for anyone who's so inclined, and also keep people from being able to easily nail their killers. After all, if someone starts yelling "JOE IS A 'CLING!" the moment they pop out of the cloner, that's fairly bwoinkable. There won't be 100% compliance, and the initial implementation will be patchy as usual, but having some IC penalty for getting cloned should make RP-heavy, powergamey-light players want to avoid it. If possible, I'd like to also include some mention of "You will only be able to retrieve these memories with heavy counseling" or the like, to provide people with an IC reward for visiting the Psychiatrist. Basically, if you sit down and RP out talking through "shit I'm a clone, what happened back there," you can circumvent the penalty (and ID your killer). This should hopefully make the Psychiatrist a little more relevant, while also allowing for a method of dealing with the penalty providing the player is willing to put in enough effort. -Implement some sort of [was cloned] penalty tag for anyone whose body was cloned. This would have a significant mechanical drawback which cannot be easily removed (that part is key). Options here include a brute/burn damage multiplier like IPCs, decreased maximum health, or a similar significant mechanical disadvantage. The goal here is to provide a penalty which even the powergamey-est of players would have to sit up and pay attention to; even if you don't give a shit about CMD, the mechanical cloning penalty would still make you sit up and pay attention. This could then be circumvented by brain transplantation into a humanized monkey (which would require both Genetics and an MD to be on the ball), or a similarly-circuitous method for anyone who really wants to get around it. -I don't mind autoprocessing and autocloning, and I'd suggest keeping it in light of the above penalties. This would make prescanning a gamble: do you hope that your body gets found, or do you just say "screw it" and hop into the cloner, hoping that you can find a competent Geneticist and MD to help you out on the other side? (or will you be too busy once cloned, and have to just deal with the penalty anyway?) Conclusion: Thank you to whoever took the time to read all this, and I hope this provides some decent food for thought. I agree that the previous Medbay system was definitely flawed in some respects, but I don't this approach is a positive one to fixing it. In lieu of the current changes, I'd like to provide labor-intensive methods to circumvent death, and to make cloning a last-resort option which no one wants to have happen. If you have any questions or comments about my proposal, feel free to make 'em.
  18. 1 point
    ISN'T THE NEW SYSTEM LOVELY. Someone blows up the bridge, kills half of command and about ten other people. The cloners are booked for the next hour, but no one else in medbay can do anything to help. Several doctors just standing around, since one of them is enough to shove a new corpse into the cloner every few minutes. Yes, that just happened. How are the other servers looking anyway?
  19. 1 point
    Made forum account just to vote. There are other ways to make death impactful without hamstringing our already always-busy medbay, like increasing cloning timers and minor changes to chemistry, restricting the amount of omni they get at start of shift from the CMO-hypo, etc. I feel that these changes were made through theorycrafting. The reason medbay works (as well as it does, when it does work well) is because people who play it know what they're doing. Not because their tools are too strong. Now medbay is as annoying to play as it is to be stuck in as a patient. This didn't make death or injury more impactful in a healthy way, it just made the unfun parts of medbay more tedious, and puts unwanted pressure on chemists, a job which has all of its TG-shortcuts gutted from it/never implemented. Also there's lights above the chem machines that seem specifically designed to splash your chemicals on by accident - that's the PR we actually need. Not something to make playing a non-surgeon medbay staffperson into a dumpster fire the second it gets busy.
  20. 1 point
    That was six not five. Also TOO SOON!
  21. 1 point
    Any and all vox spawn with a love letter written in vox-tongue, they can add a name to address a specific recipient. Naturally, vox can't love, so said love letter almost borders a war declaration in terms of hostility.
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