Fox McCloud

Guide to New Crit

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A new critical system is on its way that is more involved, chaotic, and engaging to deal with--it's a long-awaited companion for Goonchem.

 

This new system doesn't apply to all races--station races that do not utilize this new system are Diona, Slime People, and IPC; they will die using the old method of blacking out, slowly accumulating damage, then dying.

Treating people is basically the same as before, with a few nuanced caveats. You apply patches or advanced trauma/burn kits to heal people, you inject them with chems to heal them, you can throw them in cryo to stabilize them.

That said, how people lapse into crit will be fairly different. When your patient hits 0 health, they will lapse into a critical state where they can't see well, their movement can become scrambled, and they fall down a lot. During this time, they can acquire shock. Shock worsens these conditions. If shock is not treated, then the person will start undergoing cardiac failure. Treating shock can be healed by injecting saline or healing the underlying damage and getting their health solidly back into the healthy category. It's recommend you still inject saline as a primary tool, especially if they have heart failure (or you can't treat them in time while you're running to get some other medicines).

Cardiac failure is even worse than shock; it'll become even more difficult to breathe, and if left untreated, will result in full out cardiac arrest. Treating cardiac failure is done with atropine or epinephrine. This condition will not go away by merely curing the underlying damage. You must treat it with atropine or epinephrine. Both chems are equally good at treating it; having both in the bloodstream, at once, increases the chances of treating it.

Finally is cardiac arrest. When acquired, you'll flop on the ground and rapidly take brain and oxygen damage. Treating cardiac arrest can be done with full size defibs or the new handheld defibs. It it strongly recommended you utilize handheld defibs, as they're specialized in treating cardiac arrest.

Death occurs primarily by brain damage; if the brain dies, your patient dies.

 

A few helpful pointers and tips:

 

-STOP RELYING ON CRYO.  Cryo just heals damage, but doesn't treat the underlying conditions when someone is in a critical state. Time is your enemy under this new system; it's faster and better to apply patches (or advanced burn/trauma kits) or medicine directly to the patient than to throw them in cryo and wait for it to kick in and their body temperature to be low enough. Cryo should be used to stabilize patients who you don't have time to treat, but it shouldn't be the primary treatment method you rely on.

 

-THERE IS A NEW HANDHELD DEFIB. Hanheld defibs work differently from full size defibs. They do not revive people from the dead. They purely treat patients undergoing cardiac arrest. They can also treat heavy O2 damage, so even if a patient isn't undergoing cardiac arrest, they are still useful for rapidly lowering O2 damage. Full size defibs cannot treat the O2 damage like handheld ones, and have a sizeable delay before activating; it's not recommend you use full size ones unless it's a desperate situation.

 

-PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR HUD. A frowny green face is indicative of viruses; it could also mean they're in shock or undergoing cardiac failure.

 

-CPR CAN SAVE A LIFE. CPR has been buffed dramatically under this system. It heals a significant chunk of O2 damage and completely resets the losebreath timer on a patient. In can really help, in a pinch, when someone is in critical condition. Don't expect it to save someone in full out cardiac arrest though.

 

-Treating patients in deep critical is going to require a broad range of medications. It's strongly recommended you keep saline, epinephrine, mannitol, and salbutamol on you for dealing with deeply critical patients. Handheld defibs can help correct high amounts of O2 damage as can utilizing CPR, but handheld defibs can be unreliable at this task. O2 damage can accumulate incredibly rapidly, leading to a death spiral that will result in the patient's death in no time flat. In some situations, there will be cases where there nothing you can do. Treating a patient's damage is important, but always factor in shock, heart failure, and cardiac arrest into your plan of treating your patient, or else they're going to pay the ultimate price; their death.

 

I'm sure there's more, but this should help you get a good start and help you treat patients on some level. Feel free to ask me any questions though!

 

 

 

 

Edited by Fox McCloud
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Please keep this thread as a guide of how to use the new paincrit system, and not for feedback on it, memes (even if that one is FANTASTIC), etc.


That can all go here!

 

Edited by Fox McCloud

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If you have any questions on treatment, how things work, quirks, and so on and so forth, please post them here. If you have actual feedback or want to discuss it, please utilize Neca's topic.

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"Following this, you'll undergo full cardiac arrest/heart attack. In this state, you'll flop on the ground and rapidly take brain and oxygen damage."

Presumably the brain damage occurs because the brain has no ox, can injecting a lot of ox med before or during the cardiac arrest meaningfully extend the patients life? Or if not, can manitol do it?

The progression seems to be crit->shock->cardiac failure->cardiac arrest. Does damage factor into the progression besides initiating crit? A more damaged patient will have higher odds of sliding down the road to dead? Whats the mean time it takes from going from crit at 0 hp to dead in the sistem?

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Thanks for the question.

 

Having oxygen damage increases the amount of brain damage you take; a patient having no oxygen damage will greatly reduce the rate at which brain damage accumulates, but it will still accumulate.

Mannitol can also slow the brain damage accumulation. It is very much possible to attempt to stabilize someone even in full out cardiac arrest, it's just difficult and a bit of a scramble, but it is by no means a guaranteed "you let this happen, ergo you get punished" lose state.

 

You're correct on the progression. Damage is a factor. The more damage someone has, the greater probability of rolling for the negative effects (heart failure, cardiac arrest). LIkewise, the more damage they have (especially brain damage) the greater the chance for them to drop dead. Unless they lose a vital organ, they're not going to straight up drop dead until they have over 200 combined damage. Oxygen damage is weighted less harshly into factoring into when the patient dies. O2 damage is nasty for getting your patient into a deeply critical state rapidly (and rolling for negative status effects), but it is far less harsh for factoring into your patient dying...still, you should address it, because, indirectly, it can lead to brain damage.

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Updated the guide to be more clear and concise for the new crit minimal changes PR. Removed some unnecessary info and added some new; corrected errors and adjusted things to factor in the newly submitted PR.

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